Considerations when deploying multiple instances of a Jazz application

As you have seen from previous posts I’ve made on the impact of deploying multiple QM or CCM applications in your CLM environment, which were then turned into an Innovate 2014 presentation, I’ve been very interested in getting the word out on the subject.  We tend to focus on getting a good infrastructure in place, as we should, but we don’t always factor in what might be different in the usage of the Jazz applications when we have multiples of them.  I’ve been on a crusade of sorts to gather what is known in this area, consulting other SMEs like my colleague (and co-author/presenter) Ralph Schoon, architects in Rational development for the different Jazz applications and several customers.

My goal is that there would be no surprises when multiple instances of an application exist and that the behavior differences are factored in up front during usage model design.  Where differences exist and where appropriate, I’m pursuing product changes to remove them.

Following a good discussion during our session at Innovate, incorporating feedback received, Ralph and I have converted our presentation to a page on the Jazz.net deployment wiki (see Planning for multiple Jazz application server instances).  Have a look and if you have any feedback, post a comment here or better yet, post it on the wiki (see How can customers make comments on the wiki pages?).

I did a simple straw poll at Innovate to get a sense of the ranges for the number of instances of a particular Jazz application in different customer environments.  Of the 30-40 attendees, most only had one JTS but there were 3-5 that had 2-3 JTS. Several had 3-5 CCMs. Only one had multiple QMs (3). None were planning multiple RMs yet.  I’d be very interested in getting other samplings.  If you have multiple instances of any one of the Jazz applications (registered to the same JTS) or multiple JTS instances, I’d like to hear how many and understand a little more about the environment.  You can post a reply to this blog or contact me directly (tfeeney@us.ibm.com).

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