Type System Manager Part 2

Ralph Schoon has done some very useful work providing some automation around our best practice guidance for DNG type system management. Check out his blog post to learn more.

rsjazz

We finally published Maintaining the Rational DOORS Next Generation type system in a configuration-management-enabled environment. Part 3: Automation tool deep dive on Jazz.net.This was a major effort and took a long time to do. This article provides a closer look at the source code, what it does and how it does it. It also provides some insight in how OSLC4J works and can be used. The information in the article, especially for setup and deployment of the automation prototype is very reusable for other scenarios and I hope to be able to reuse it in later articles and blog posts.

Type System Manager

When this effort was planned and performed last year, we had no idea what would come out of this effort. When we finished the first iterations and I started to write Maintaining the Rational DOORS Next Generation type system in a configuration-management-enabled environment. Part 3: Automation tool…

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How to register your custom utilities as a resource-intensive scenario

In Resource-intensive scenarios that can degrade CLM application performance I describe how certain IBM Collaborative Lifecycle Management (CLM) application scenarios can be resource-intensive and known to degrade system performance at times. As I’ve intereracted with customers on their deployments and performance concerns, it is apparent that they are getting more and more creative in building custom automation scripts/utilities using our APIs. At times, these custom utilities have generated significant load on the system.

As a best practice, we now recommend that customers evaluate their custom utilities and determine if any are candidates to be resource-intensive. For those that are, they should be modified and registered as resource-intensive with appropriate start and stop scenario markers included in the code. Until recently, all we could provide to help do this was some code snippets.

Thanks to my colleagues Ralph Schoon, Dinesh Kumar and Shubjit Naik, we now have documented guidance and sample code to help you do this. Have a look at Register Custom Scripts As a Resource Intensive Scenario. Ralph also gives some additional detail behind the motivation for the custom scenario registration in his blog post.

Once registered, you will now be able to track their occurrence in the appropriate application log. If you’ve implemented enterprise application monitoring, you can track for available JMX MBeans as described in CLM Monitoring.